About your Search

20130107
20130115
STATION
CSPAN 46
LANGUAGE
English 46
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
the challenges of the uncertainty they will be facing as soldiers in a counterterrorism environment. it shows this environment they are facing is not precise and orally. the leader they have to be is empfide by the stampede and the circumstances are frequently confusing. the rain is blowing sideways, there is dark and ominous clouds and seems like it's gretting barely brighter as he goes forward. some of the parts of the organization are way ahead and some may or may not catch up. and you have a lightning bolt that is going off that you have to confront. well on behalf of the people up at west point, i want to tell you it's been our pleasure and honor to be able to teach the cadets that are there that are understanding more and more of what they have to confront with regard to terrorism and terrorists and they are up to that task. last summer my son happened to be graduating with the class of 2012. the class of 2012 picked for their class motto for more than ourselves. i think that that reflects the generation of young men and young women that are coming to the military academy at west point
millions of dollars with every weather event. it means creating a living environment for the people of haiti, and the government has the instruments available, the tools available to it to make a goal of regional planning. these instruments, the national center, supported by funds from the european union and others for regional planning, which, again, you contribute to with your funds. i wish to thank you for this contribution. let me say that our administration will use these funds to the hilt. in the longer time frame, so we can leave our fingerprints on the haitian area. as you can see in this area, this is on the front of those helping us. europe is at the forefront, able to continue to inspire everyone, and as the world realizes, they cannot go it alone. it has to be in the regions, the larger regions, so we can find a single voice, so we can give each other mutual support while maintaining identity. i say to them that all of our strategies and their solidarity has not been wasted. those that are most vulnerable are the ones then have benefited the most. there is taking shape i
industry. together we put in place a stronger environment in which the private sector can create good paying jobs, and virginia is now outperforming its neighboring states. we have also worked hard together to get our fiscal house in order. three years ago, together we closed a budget shortfall of $6 billion without raising taxes. the results were good. we have had three consecutive budget surpluses totaling $1.40 billion. we more than doubled the rainy day fund. we gave two 3% performance bonuses to our great state employees. we have maintained virginia aaa bond rating while the federal government was losing theirs. we bolstered agency efficiency. we eliminated and consolidated dozens of boards and commissions and agencies and programs to save money. we set priorities and cut spending. in the last three years, i have recommended and you have accepted cuts and reallocations of spending of more than a billion dollars, and i thank you for that. we have made government live within its means. we put the most defunding into transportation since 1986 and stayed within zero or five%, self-im
afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concern. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already have given their approval to this relationship and value it as one that is good for afghanistan. in that context, the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve, and i am sure we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghanistan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about during our conversations, and perhaps many times in that conversation, beginning with the composition of, of course. i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in the past 10 years and that those gains will be kept by any standard while we're working for peace and stability in afghanistan, including concern
out space. it's so much easier to shut down a shop than it is in this environment. the colorado version of the law makes the law enforcement side of this much more challenging. >> and so the next thing that they could do is simply repeal it. and say if you're going to crack down on our regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, then do what you can. >> you might notice that some of the initial ones were rebellious by nature. i think marijuana users describe themselves -- some of them have a distaste for it being legal because they're now abiding with the law. if what there is is a very aggressive response you're going to tap in their rebellious spirit. >> we're seeing a breakdown of a federal relationship. michael will give us a broader context than what we're seeing. >> there is a sort of tempting federalism prospect on this which sees something along the following lines. and angela alluded to this. look, the resurgence of american federalism because states have preferences here. there's no reason. let's experiment. i don't think that's necessarily wrong. bu
and how to give actionable advice requires knowing, and i would argue working in, environments that require close cooperation. that is why our job is not to wait for legal questions to be brought to us or to provide advice on operational decisions after those decisions have been made. our job is to be present at the beginning and throughout the process. just like other senior national security official across the government, the person in my seat, since the creation of nsd, has attended the morning terrorism threat briefing along with the attorney-general and the director of the fbi. just like the analysts and special agents who are working these issues, we aim to stay on top of the threat picture and to help devise tactics and strategies and tools for getting ahead of it. today its standard -- it is standard procedure for agents conducting counterterrorism investigations to consult throughout the process with attorneys and prosecutors in the national security division. that is to ensure that all potential avenues for destruction of a threat, intelligence gathering, investigati
business. the combination of policies that are not hostile to business and an environment which actually welcomes new businesses and new jobs is working. it is clear. in a competitive world, policies matter. companies have choices. job-creators have choices. that is why our work is far from done. that is why a top priority must be to continue new jersey's record of excellence in education and to fix problems where we are failing. in higher education, the task force led with skill by former governor tom kean has helped us develop strategies for making new jersey's institutions more competitive. we need to turn new jersey's universities -- including rutgers -- from good to great, because that will help us keep more talented new jersey students in new jersey and will strengthen the link between higher education and high quality jobs. at the heart of these reforms we need, of course, is the plan to make sure that new jersey's critically important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in th
is summarize the threats we face in the broader strategic environment in which our counter-terrorism efforts take place. the death of osama bin laden marked a milestone in our efforts to defeat al qaeda. al qaeda's ranks have been decimated. more key leaders have been eliminated in rapid succession at any time since 9/11. virtually every major a al qaeda affiliate has lost its key leader or operational commander. more than half of their top leadership has been eliminated. al qaeda is on the ropes and continues to get pummeled. however, his death and the capture of many other al qaeda leaders and operatives do not mark the end of al qaeda or its continued plotting against the united states and other countries. the preeminent security threat to the ad states remains al qaeda and its adherents. since september 11, the counter- terrorism effort has been aimed at preventing the counter terror -- the counter efforts of al qaeda on the homeland. al qaeda continues to edify operatives overseas and develop new methods overseas to attack us at home. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core l
in the state of the union to work together. we have tried to create an environment where we would be able to work on things that have historically been challenging, but i think we need to do both. >> i think i am out of time. >> we will get the clock fixed. >> thank you for your service, mr. chairman. i want to draw attention to the last time you came before this committee. it was an unusual time were you did not just talk about a balanced budget, but as you referenced, you working with president clinton and this conference -- and this congress produced a balanced budget, something that no other president before or since has done in decades. our republican colleagues, when they took over instead of building on that success, they squandered that success. they never met a tax break that they did not like and they believed in the alchemy that those tax breaks would not for pay for themselves. that in addition to the tax breaks that they advanced, they advanced one increase in spending after another, increasing spending at an incredible rate without wanting to pay for it. after eight years of
competitive environment from which to go out and compete around the world and win. host: one thing we heard leading up to discussions late last year is that some type of certainty was needed from decisions made. did the people you represent find the guest: certainty there is some of it. much is to be done because long- term overhang is still serious. nobody believes that our current spending course is sustainable. we have made promises that cannot be paid for. maybe not tomorrow or five years from now, but down the road changes need to be made. you're seeing this at the state level where governors and in both parties and legislative bodies are coming together. watch illinois right now, they are struggling with their pension debt, but at the national level we have not had the success yet that some of the states of had. host: looking at spending federally, what has to be guest::the first quarter this year is one that debate will take place. you have the debt ceiling, a continuing resolution. at the end of march, the year is half over. did you have sequestration mandated. those are all intertw
, these are women who have either come out of this environment, out of an urban center in particular. we have our own struggles in the rural parts of america. we need to bring these things to the discussion. that is what we need to do. i do not think we will find solutions to the questions that the caller had until we get those people living with the struggles of the table. that means more women, more african-americans, more hispanics, more men and women of color. i feel strongly that we need more women in this discussion. we're still sitting at 20% of congress. we have a long way to go. host: caller in richmond, democrats line. caller: i was wondering how we will ever get equal pay when states like virginia have the right to work law and they can fire you for any reason. and the company i work for, if you discuss what you make to another employee, you can get fired. guest: it is about laws. laws are made by elected officials. who is representing us at the state legislature and in congress matters. we can overturn right to work laws. and we can pass it will pay laws. we need the right people to s
.s.s., perhaps should be funded by the space operations budget. we're in a challenging budget environment. fiscal realities demand that nasa become more efficient. consensus has to be established among agency stakeholders, and also to clarify nasa's strategic vision, goals, and mission. the good work that nasa has done and that nasa can do in the future is so very important to me, and to everyone here in this room. i want to preserve our international space station. it is not likely with this electorate than we can expect to go to mars until people can go to the grocery store. it is about the economy. the economy has to improve. i want to work together to insure the american people can get the kind of results that nasa is capable of producing. we have a distinguished panel of witnesses today. this should spark much-needed national dialogue about nasa's future. the group is uniquely qualified to start this important discussion by sharing their own perspective about the strategic direction of america's space program. that concludes my remarks. i now recognize mrs. johnson for her opening statement.
the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concerns in that regard for the afghan people. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already in the -- called for the strategic partnership agreement between us and the united states have given their approval to this relationship and they value it as one that is good for afghanistan. so in that context the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve and i'm sure we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghanistan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about. during our conversations and perhaps many times in that conversation beginning with the conversation of course i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in the past 10 years and that
environment. which renewables in particular do you see having that sort of potential? is it wind, solar, wave, geothermal? >> the kind of numbers i'm talking about, you double energy demand in the world and supply 30% of it from renewables from say 1% or 2%. >> where will it come from? >> certainly wind is part of that, maybe solar -- there's some optimism there's in breakthroughs potentially coming there. i think ultimately hydrogen may be on the table as part of that answer. i will say all of these are important. all of these potentially fill some of that space. they all need additional technology applied to them and we have to come down the cost curve. it's always interesting to look at what we as a company do. i'll tell you our focus right now when it comes to the emissions space and the idea why we would push renewables, our focus is around carbon -capturing storage and around biofuels, particular types of biofuels that meet this low co-2 potential standpoint. and we have a wind business but to be perfectly frank, it's not growing very fast. >> i hope we'll come back to this but let's mo
sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we can correct what i have come to view as a very mistaken and ultimately counterproductive idea that has captured the business world. this is the idea that corporations are run well, when they are run to maximize shareholder value, specifically measured by share price. many people in the room may have the reaction, but isn't that something that has been accepted forever? don't we all know that the purpose of the corporation is to maximize profits for shareholders? i would say no, actually, that is not an idea that has been around forever. that is a pretty new idea. if you were to get in a time machine and go back and study the first eight decades of the 20th century, and it is at the beginning of the 20th century were refer start to see the great public corporations that we think of today when we think
in afghanistan? thank you. >> the interment of the -- environment of the narcotrafficker forces in uncertainty. when they raise an orchard or vineyard and turns it into a poppy field -- when he is not sure what is learned happened to him or his family, they turn to narcotics. it takes three months to grow it. it does not need refrigeration or economic integration, nothing. if we see an increased degree of uncertainty, we would probably see more poppy cultivation. it would be listed economic activities. -- illicit economic activities. the leadership [indiscernible] in the areas where the economy is thriving, we have seen a reduction of narcotics and cultivation of the poppy. in areas where we see most of the fighting, that is where most of the poppies are grown. >> let me close with a final question. jim used a number of statistics. one that struck me is i have the right to a 52% of the afghan population thought the country is going on in the right direction. my question to each of you, what is your view? is the country going in the right direction and are you optimistic or pessimistic as we lo
better in private. and it is as free as possible from early judgment so that you create an environment around learn in. >> my name is david sherman from the american federation of teachers. i want to say that the american federation of teachers, as was mentioned, was very involved in the development of the common core, not we as an organization, but hundreds of teachers around the country. we support it with every fiber of our being. we want to see it work. but we are very nervous. we are mainly norris -- nervous because what we are hearing from all over the country' with few exceptions is that teachers are not being prepared or given the right kind of professional development. they have a few days of the workshop. but teachers, and frankly, parents, are just not being prepared. i do have a question. since there is no teacher voice here, and going to take a moment if you do not mind. just a minute. the fact of the matter is, teachers are very supportive of the common core. teachers all across the country, but they want help to do it the right way, and they are not getting it. the feder
up a much more friendly environment to talk about the issues. host: fawn johnson, correspondent with national journal, we're focusing the "washington journal" this morning on issues surrounding immigration. later on, we'll talk to some reporters as well as folks on both sides of the issue right here on n washington, d.c. haour first phone call is from ryan in texas on our democrats line. hi, ryan. caller: yes, how you doing? host: good. caller: i would like to say, they're not going to enforce the immigration laws. some of the people that i know out with these charges, that they're not going to follow immigration rules, just some of these guys that got these crack charges and trying to get back to their families. host: you're talking about drug charges? ok. let's go to trevor in arlington, virginia, on our independent line. hi, trevor. caller: hello. how you doing? host: good morning. caller: basically the premise of my question is, you know, everybody involved in deciding what's going to happen with immigration, you would think they would have to be thinking, how much more reve
you would look at the material? >> we are all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i've done about iraq even before we went in was conditioned tempered by that experience in vietnam. and whatever i will do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shape me just like anyone who has gone through war, those experiences shape you very much. one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined i suspect to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important especially in the world we flive today. i think something else is important here and cer
feinstein, chairman of intelligence, patty murray, chair budget. barbara boxer, chair of the environment. seven women for ranking members on the house committee. on the republican side? every major committee is led by a white male. in fact there is only one woman sharing a minor committee in the house. so, what does this mean? does it really matter? it changes the conversation that the negotiation table. senator gillibrand often tells the story of serving on the armed services committee. when they were talking about military readiness, she and women like daddy giffords were there to rest questions about personnel and mental health programs for the troops and their families at home. you cannot tell me that if we had two or three women involved in the fiscal cliff debate over the last month that we would not have gotten through it faster. i was at home over the hollow eyes with my father. we knew where we would end up. we knew that there would be tax increases. but women just want to get these things done and keep moving forward. these republican men, john boehner in particular, tend to wa
environment. the nature of our debate of cyber has been the digital pearl harbor. the greater national security threat is the gradual loss of intellectual property. it is effort by a thousand cuts. part of the challenge at 35 is not just scaling costs but the leakage through cyber theft, which does not mean someone else can build it but they are gaining knowledge and capacity in a way they would not have been able to. something that may have given you a ten-year advantage does not give you that kind of advantage at technological capacity. >> i would like to tie it back to our economy and jobs. president obama said the focus would be to increase jobs. i come back to paul. you said that the success of our [indiscernible]channel some of the budget from the dod to the state department. i take this time to say that hillary clinton is coming back to work today. i wish her great recovery. if we have projected our intent is to china and the world. looking at the way china has been aggressive many ways in the south china sea. [indiscernible]how do we look into that without freedom of navigation
. the combination of policies that are not hostile to business and an environment which actually welcomes new businesses and new jobs is working. it is clear. in a competitive world, policies matter. companies have choices. job-creators have choices. that is why our work is far from done. that is why a top priority must be to continue new jersey's record of excellence in education and to fix problems where we are failing. in higher education, the task force led with skill by former governor tom kean has helped us develop strategies for making new jersey's institutions more competitive. we need to turn new jersey's universities -- including rutgers -- from good to great, because that will help us keep more talented new jersey students in new jersey and will strengthen the link between higher education and high quality jobs. at the heart of these reforms we need, of course, is the plan to make sure that new jersey's critically important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in the south, we w
. >> do you think there is a way we can do corporate reform in this environment? >> is extremely difficult but i think one really positive thing that came out of this fiscal debates this time is that for the first time in a long time, the business community unified around a concept of getting our deficit under control. they were not as worried about their individual tax breaks that might go as a result of having some reform. i hope that mood continues. that was a one group does not argue over one other or about accelerated depreciation and so forth. i am more hopeful that a more unified view from the business community is possible this time. >> i want to say one thing -- i'm not fully knowledgeable about this. i was at a meeting earlier today we're in noted tax expert said you cannot do corporate reform and not to individual reform because when we change the parameters, a whole lot of entities shifted from c corporations to other forms that were taxed on the individual side. if you lower rates on the corporate tax and get away with some of the preferences for oil and gas and various things
? that is a very rich interest level, in our current interest- rate environment. you have to wonder if the bank is not just holding on to your loan to maintain a high level of interest? but i wonder if this may be worth your while to try to go to another bank and not refinance with the same company. it has become a much more difficult circumstance to get a mortgage because the banks are still recovering from all of the bad loans that they made during the real-estate mania. >> one other issue that was brought up was the issue of debt-income ratio, and this is something richard spoke about and what he would do with the qualified loans. american hero joe says, what did he mean by 20% of the grossly month in come? explain this issue for us? >> this goes to the heart of the ability to repay the loan issue, that described a little bit ago. we don't want people taking on loans they cannot afford to repay, that leads us to problems. what they have decided is that 43% is the outside level, if your mortgage debt, plus or other debt, with car loans or consumer debt or credit cards, -- if your other obliga
to their environment, office furniture, software needed -- which nevwhenever thy to support the core for environment. at that time i was hired with the company. i was working seven days a week nonstop as all over corporations were installing $15 million systems like you would go out and buy a pack of gum. i think taxation against large corporations is what is part of our problem in this country right now. i believe if we would give them an incentive to be able to do that got onhighere and penalizing them for being successful, i think we would have a lot better environment economically. basically this all ties to the tax deductions that everyone is looking at, and i heard rumblings of a simple tax. well, we're not in a position right now to offer that. it sounds like a great idea, but something that would have to evolve over time. my point i am trying to make on the obama care thing, and i did not mention that, but i feel it they had a corporate tax, not a loophole, but basically a did nation tax, corporations could do a fund that would support a medical plan and the country, we would not have the co
? thank you. >> the interment of the -- environment of the narcotrafficker forces in uncertainty. when they raise an orchard or vineyard and turns it into a poppy field -- when he is not sure what is learned happened to him or his family, they turn to narcotics. it takes three months to grow it. it does not need refrigeration or economic integration, nothing. if we see an increased degree of uncertainty, we would probably see more poppy cultivation. it would be listed economic activities. -- illicit economic activities. the leaderships and international community. in the areas where the economy is thriving, we have seen a reduction of narcotics and cultivation of the poppy. in areas where we see most of the fighting, that is where most of the poppies are grown. >> let me close with a final question. jim used a number of statistics. one that struck me is i have the right to a 52% of the afghan population thought the country is going on in the right direction. my question to each of you, what is your view? is the country going in the right direction and are you optimistic or pessimistic
for the environment, it is good for the economy. we want to create the charge new york program. this is the future, my friends, and we want to invest in an electric car network to reduce reliance on fossil fuels, installing a state wide network of charges stations and have a new york to be one of the four runners in this race all across the country. we want to attract a national start to lead our efforts. we want to introduce you to the former senior adviser to the u.s. secretary of energy, steven chu. he is leaving washington, he is coming to new york. he is going to lead our efforts. welcome aboard. [applause] one of our other challenges is to have a ready work force. our work force training is still from a different era. we have talked about this for many years but we have not made enough progress. we must match and train our work force for the jobs of today and tomorrow. we must change and we imagine the way suny and cuny systems work. we need a job linkage program, jobs are coming back from overseas. that is the good news. what the employers found out was that more than low-paid workers, employe
. [applause] we are getting an environment where business can grow, an environment that has been created by all of you and especially the leadership of governor cuomo. [applause] leadership that has companies like mine following a path to new york. tid pleasure of meeting the governor last month and it is my pleasure and honor to introduce him to you now, the governor of the state of new york, andrew comb month -- cuomo. >> [applause] >> thank you, thank you very much. thank you very much. happy new year new york. first, let me acknowledge and thank the greatest partner a governor could ever had lieutenant governor bob duffy who has been magnificent in the work he had done for this state. the question can one person make a difference in life. bob duffy has made a tremendous difference aross this state and we oh him gratitude. let's give him another round of applause. [applause] to the elected and legislative leaders who have been introduced once before, it's a pleasure to be with you. attorney general, thank you for being here. co-leaders senators, pleasure to be with you, assembly speak
as to believe that we ever could have done anything close to a 10. given the domestic political environment, international situation, we are in, the weakness of our economy there is nothing of the seven or eight in the cards. it is worth looking at a 10 to realize why we are not in the best of all possible worlds. issue one is the big enchilada, in dealing with the long-term fiscal balance that we face in 8 sensible way. i would have given a 10 to what folks were talking about the new was unachievable, the grants bargain be -- the grand bargain taxes that would have stabilized the debt to gdp ratio. that would have been a package somewhere in the 2-$3 trillion range. the tiny between the election in the first to work out all those details. irrespective of that, we have two political party snarling at each other and not a whole lot in the way of negotiations. that was not in the cards. nine would have come from enacting some big pieces accompanied by a framework that would specify how the rest of the puzzle would be put together over the next six months. some incredible enforcement mechanism
are lined and which will work in this new environment? >> we're taking a little bit different approach. we're trying to go to a teacher- centered approach where teachers build units backwards starting with the course and aligning assessments and trading strategies and choosing resources that meet their needs in that unit. we're trying to move away from the big book that we all had on our desk and we all read, the various snippets of different pieces of literature. and go toward the notion of less is more and shoes the most and meatist materials. one of the things we're -- we encourage teachers to think about, is that the only to learn it, or could students have some choice? maybe a menu would yield better information we have on student motivation. students have to see this as meaningful to their lives to have the level of engagement that ends up being a sustainable. we are trying to move away from the district-wide adoptions and try to empower teachers that are working together to purchase the things they feel are most relevant to their students and the way they are going to approach these
interest level in this environment. you have to wonder if the bank isn't holding on to your loan to maintain that high level of interest. i wonder if the might be worth your while to try to go to another bank and not refinance with the same company. it has become a much more difficult circumstances to get a mortgage because the banks are still recovering from all the bad loans that day made during the real estate mania. host: this idea of the debt to income ratio. that was something richard cordray talked-about. this is from american hero joe. explain this issue for us. guest: this goes to the heart of the ability to repay the loan. we do not want people taking on loans that they cannot afford to repay. 43% is the outside level. if your mortgage debt sure other debt -- car loans, credit cards -- exceed 43% of your growth or pre-tax income, then that is too much. that is a loan that is becoming too onerous and you might have trouble repaying. anything below 43% is acceptable as a qualified mortgage. anything above that starts to get into the territory of you are not having enough
>> brian, we're all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us. their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i had done about iraq, ev before we went into iraq was conditioned by, tempered by that experience in vietnam and whatever i will ever do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shaped me just like anyone who has gone through war. those experiences shape you very much. and one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined, i suspect, to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things, diplomacy is critically important especially in a complicated world that we live in today. i think something else is important here
president obama. host: the director at their center for energy and environment. and if you want to find out more about what goes on at the cei you can go to their website. we're going back to the phones and talk to gary on our line for republicans. caller: good morning. my experience with co2 is like in 1957, on the southeastern ash reel forest right there after you come out of florida. it's off to your left first after you go past the first exit to valdosta georgia. the moss was 2 feet high on the trunks. 50 years later, it was 110, 115 feet high. that's what moss, mold, middleu, pond scum. they like a little more co2. so does poison ivy, mosquitos, ticks. plants do grow better but like grapes they produce less sugar when they have higher co2. you have more yellow leaves. and i think one of the solutions would be for everybody to grow their grass longer because it would consume more co2 and produce more oxygen. you would have better water retention. aquifer regeneration, water purifyication, more lightning bugs that hate moss and slugs. host: we're going to leave it there. is that the solu
only voted for obama. that kind of sets up a much more friendly environment to talk about the issues. host: fawn johnson, correspondent with national journal, we're focusing the "washington journal" this morning on issues surrounding immigration. later on, we'll talk to some reporters as well as folks on both sides of the issue right here on n washington, d.c. our first phone call is from ryan in texas on our democrats line. hi, ryan. caller: yes, how you doing? host: good. caller: i would like to say, they're not going to enforce the immigration laws. some of the people that i know out with these charges, that they're not going to follow immigration rules, just some of these guys that got these crack charges and trying to get back to their families. host: you're talking about drug charges? ok. let's go to trevor in arlington, virginia, on our independent line. hi, trevor. caller: hello. how you doing? host: good morning. caller: basically the premise of my question is, you know, everybody involved in deciding what's going to happen with immigration, you would think they would have t
to business and an environment which actually welcomes new businesses and new jobs is working. it is clear. in a competitive world, policies matter. companies have choices. job-creators have choices. that is why our work is far from done. that is why a top priority must be to continue new jersey's record of excellence in education and to fix problems where we are failing. in higher education, the task force led with skill by former governor tom kean has helped us develop strategies for making new jersey's institutions more competitive. we need to turn new jersey's universities -- including rutgers -- from good to great, because that will help us keep more talented new jersey students in new jersey and will strengthen the link between higher education and high quality jobs. need, of course, is the plan to make sure that new jersey's health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in the south, we will enhance three established hubs of educational excellence in north, south, and central new jersey. and we will
. [video clip] >> we are all products of our experience and environment. i have been tempered by the experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy and military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose in power. no question much of the questioning i have done about iraq and was tempered by the experience in vietnam. whenever i will ever do in my life -- whatever i will do in my life, those experiences shaped me, just like anyone who has gone through war. those experiences shape you very much. it makes you less inclined to jump into war. it is easy to get into war, not very easy to get out, as evidenced by the johnson tapes. you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important, especially in the complicated world we live in today. i think something else is important here and a lesson we learned from vietnam. what is going to be very important for america is not to isolate ourselves in the wo
about the agenda for the 113th congress and the political environment this year. this is just under an hour. host: in our sunday roundtable two veterans of capitol. john freehery, longtime republican strategist and staffer to dennis hastert and jim manley, who worked for senators kennedy and reid. let's begin with the words of bob woodward it avoid the crisis next time try dell getting the job. players used their staff as messagers and backen but never empowered them to solve the problem. could the staffers have done better? guest: as a former staffer you always think that you know all the solutions but it is the members of congress and senators that have to face election. it is a lot easier to get in a back room without worrying about constituents and solve these problems. i know a lot of staffers would be mortified with what bob woodward had to say. guest: it didn't and it didn't work in the debt limit debacle. i have a lot of respect for bob woodward. i'm not not quite sure i understood what that was getting at. staffers can only go so far and it is up to members to legislate. an
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)